Sunday, July 26, 2009

Yoga, getting balance, Elwing and Fiordland Earthquakes

I started yoga some years ago to experience what it'd be like as a preliminary to my winter sport of nordic skiing, but by this autumn and early winter it'd become something I've embraced in it's own right, especially when a certain type or flow, started proving itself as suited to me when taught by Laurie of Hawea Flat. She is going back to her roots in US soon, so I've been making the most of the opportunity to learn from such a skilled teacher, and her wise words: "Just remember the greatest beauty of our inner teacher"

Laurie and mist over Hawea Flat...
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To me one aspect of yoga is what I call "opening" and in the process learning to observe self and breath. The interesting thing about this concept is it aids us in releasing stored emotions and hurt in areas of our body. I guess we start laying these down in childhood. I've realised lately that my current feelings of being more emotional are linked to the 3-5 hours of practice I'm doing weekly.

We all deal with a myriad of feelings day-to-day such as concern for our children, relationships and the suffering we see with others. Despite this I was quite surprised last Sunday to find myself out in the beginnings of wild weather doing a tour in the evening at the Snow Farm, and getting to a windy saddle and just staying there for as long as I could re-centering and getting balanced. Wilderness and wild conditions are a gift to me!

Savouring the view toward Lake Hawea and End Peak by the Dingle Burn, with the Criffel Range in the foreground, all with a great storm coming - our first for weeks...
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Looking across the saddle I was standing on, with Bob Lee Hut on the sky line. You can see how the prevailing wind [right to left] has been slowed by the fence enough so the snow being transported could fall to the ground...
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The trail I was using, suited to the Classic style of cross country or Nordic skiing...
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On July 15 we experienced the most amazing earthquake here in Wanaka. I always enjoy these, but this one was such that after I'd indulged that passion I became concerned about who had been affected, and I must say I was amazed with how I found out so much within 15 mins. using my iPhone. I was pretty sure it had been in Fiordland and this was confirmed, so then, as I've done when down there on the yacht Elwing, started wondering how my friends who were there again sans Dougal and myself had fared.

Elwing anchored by Spit Island July 08...
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In light of my current heightened emotional state this morning I found myself pondering that Elwing was named after a Tolkien character and the name relates to the mist from a waterfall glistening in the moonlight. I know her to be one of the loves of my life, and yes she's kept us safe, and even today I still marvel how ships like her can have a female persona. I used to think they're inanimate objects, but to me she is much much more. Why is this? That I perceive her as forgiving, responsive, dynamic, rhythmical, stable, considerate, warm and loving - an angel really!

Arthur ferrying putting us ashore from Elwing in Preservation...
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Being concerned I contacted Bluff Fisherman's Radio and at least found out Elwing was still afloat and all were well, but I've had to wait until their return to get the real story and it's been published by our friend Charmian who was on board and works for the Otago Daily Times. It's a scary and sobering tale, but sure enough Elwing kept everyone safe while she worked uncompromisingly with her skipper Arthur. Quote of the year surely has to be Arthur's "Look out! We're in the trees. Start the engine, Barb!" ...more>>




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2 Comments:

Blogger Ruahines said...

Kia ora Don,
Thanks for a very thoughtful post here. I have been considering yoga for some time now, along with guitar lessons, but keep finding myself further away. The concept of stored emotions and hurt inhibiting our bodies, and minds, is very real to me. I know there are times in the mountains when I can literally start hypervenilating for no apparent reason, yet when done feel a great sense of relief and release. Maybe it is time to try a path out here as well.
Glad to read you came through the quake in good nick.
Cheers,
Robb

July 27, 2009 at 10:13 AM  
Blogger Donald said...

Pleasure Robb. Feeling a bit behind with blog reading, commenting etc. Just lots going on, inc. thinking! And doing my best on that to not intellectualize too much, but lead with the heart [yoga saying].

Life should get easier now as spring approaches. We'll still get some good storms, but the sting looks like it's going.

July 27, 2009 at 10:25 AM  

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